Lemon Law >> Lemon Law for the state of California 

Senior Mag Home

Search

Elder Law

Assisted Living Senior Residence & Care

Senior Home Care & Healthcare Agencies

Canadian Pharmacies

Senior Health

Medical Glossaries

Personal Growth

Senior Money

State/Local Svcs

Wisdom 'n Humor

Computer Corner

Senior Travel

Senior Resources 
More Resources

About Senior Mag
 

 

 

Lemon Law - California 

Lemon Law

Lemon Law - "Lemon law" is that body of state law which defines an automobile owners rights when the manufacturer is not able to repair the automobile within the limits specified.  In such cases, the automobile is referred to as a "lemon", and is subject to the conditions of the state lemon law.  

Your Lemon Law:

Disclaimer:  These pages are created to inform and educate the public about lemon law and under the lemon law in your state. They are not and should not be considered legal opinions or advice as to whether you have rights under lemon law or whether you should pursue "a lemon law case".  If after reading this information, you believe you qualify, you should seek the advice and counsel of an attorney specializing in lemon law in your state.  Remember that each state's lemon laws vary.

California Civil Code Section 1793.22.

(a) This section shall be known and may be cited as the Tanner Consumer Protection Act.

(b) It shall be presumed that a reasonable number of attempts have been made to conform a new motor vehicle to the applicable express warranties if, within 18 months from delivery to the buyer or 18,000 miles on the odometer of the vehicle, whichever occurs first, one or more of the following occurs:

(1) The same nonconformity results in a condition that is likely to cause death or serious bodily injury if the vehicle is driven and the nonconformity has been subject to repair two or more times by the manufacturer or its agents, and the buyer or lessee has at least once directly notified the manufacturer of the need for the repair of the nonconformity.

(2) The same nonconformity has been subject to repair four or more times by the manufacturer or its agents and the buyer has at least once directly notified the manufacturer of the need for the repair of the nonconformity.

(3) The vehicle is out of service by reason of repair of nonconformities by the manufacturer or its agents for a cumulative total of more than 30 calendar days since delivery of the vehicle to the buyer. The 30-day limit shall be extended only if repairs cannot be performed due to conditions beyond the control of the manufacturer or its agents. The buyer shall be required to directly notify the manufacturer pursuant to paragraphs (1) and (2) only if the manufacturer has clearly and conspicuously disclosed to the buyer, with the warranty or the owner's manual, the provisions of this section and that of subdivision (d) of Section 1793.2, including the requirement that the buyer must notify the manufacturer directly pursuant to paragraphs (1) and (2). The notification, if required, shall be sent to the address, if any, specified clearly and conspicuously by the manufacturer in the warranty or owner's manual. This presumption shall be a rebuttable presumption affecting the burden of proof, and it may be asserted by the buyer in any civil action, including an action in small claims court, or other formal or informal proceeding.

(c) If a qualified third-party dispute resolution process exists, and the buyer receives timely notification in writing of the availability of that qualified third-party dispute resolution process with a description of its operation and effect, the presumption in subdivision (b) may not be asserted by the buyer until after the buyer has initially resorted to the qualified third-party dispute resolution process as required in subdivision (d). Notification of the availability of the qualified third-party dispute resolution process is not timely if the buyer suffers any prejudice resulting from any delay in giving the notification. If a qualified third-party dispute resolution process does not exist, or if the buyer is dissatisfied with that third-party decision, or if the manufacturer or its agent neglects to promptly fulfill the terms of the qualified third-party dispute resolution process decision after the decision is accepted by the buyer, the buyer may assert the presumption provided in subdivision (b) in an action to enforce the buyer's rights under subdivision (d) of Section 1793.2. The findings and decision of a qualified third-party dispute resolution process shall be admissible in evidence in the action without further foundation. Any period of limitation of actions under any federal or California laws with respect to any person shall be extended for a period equal to the number of days between the date a complaint is filed with a third-party dispute resolution process and the date of its decision or the date before which the manufacturer or its agent is required by the decision to fulfill its terms if the decision is accepted by the buyer, whichever occurs later.

(d)A qualified third-party dispute resolution process shall be one that does all of the following:

(1) Complies with the minimum requirements of the Federal Trade Commission for informal dispute settlement procedures as set forth in Part 703 of Title 16 of the Code of Federal Regulations, as those regulations read on January 1, 1987.

(2) Renders decisions which are binding on the manufacturer if the buyer elects to accept the decision.

(3) Prescribes a reasonable time, not to exceed 30 days after the decision is accepted by the buyer, within which the manufacturer or its agent must fulfill the terms of its decisions.

(4) Provides arbitrators who are assigned to decide disputes with copies of, and instruction in, the provisions of the Federal Trade Commission's regulations in Part 703 of Title 16 of the Code of Federal Regulations as those regulations read on January 1, 1987, Division 2 (commencing with Section 2101) of the Commercial Code, and this chapter.

(5)Requires the manufacturer, when the process orders, under the terms of this chapter, either that the nonconforming motor vehicle be replaced if the buyer consents to this remedy or that restitution be made to the buyer, to replace the motor vehicle or make restitution in accordance with paragraph (2) of subdivision (d) of Section 1793.2.

(6)Provides, at the request of the arbitrator or a majority of the arbitration panel, for an inspection and written report on the condition of a nonconforming motor vehicle, at no cost to the buyer, by an automobile expert who is independent of the manufacturer.

(7)Takes into account, in rendering decisions, all legal and equitable factors, including, but not limited to, the written warranty, the rights and remedies conferred in regulations of the Federal Trade Commission contained in Part 703 of Title 16 of the Code of Federal Regulations as those regulations read on January 1, 1987, Division 2 (commencing with Section 2101) of the Commercial Code, this chapter, and any other equitable considerations appropriate in the circumstances. Nothing in this chapter requires that, to be certified as a qualified third-party dispute resolution process pursuant to this section, decisions of the process must consider or provide remedies in the form of awards of punitive damages or multiple damages, under subdivision (c) of Section 1794, or of attorneys' fees under subdivision (d) of Section 1794, or of consequential damages other than as provided in subdivisions (a) and(b)of Section 1794, including, but not limited to, reasonable repair, towing, and rental car costs actually incurred by the buyer.

(8)Requires that no arbitrator deciding a dispute may be a party to the dispute and that no other person, including an employee, agent, or dealer for the manufacturer, may be allowed to participate substantively in the merits of any dispute with the arbitrator unless the buyer is allowed toparticipate also. Nothing in this subdivision prohibits any member of anarbitration board from deciding a dispute.

(9)Obtains and maintains certification by the Department of Consumer Affairs pursuant to Chapter 9 (commencing with Section 472) of Division 1 of the Business and Professions Code.

(e)For the purposes of subdivision (d) of Section 1793.2 and this section, the following terms have the following meanings:

(1)"Nonconformity" means a nonconformity which substantially impairs the use, value, or safety of the new motor vehicle to the buyer or lessee.

(2)"New motor vehicle" means a new motor vehicle that is bought or used primarily for personal, family, or household purposes. "New motor vehicle" also means a new motor vehicle with a gross vehicle weight under 10,000 pounds that is bought or used primarily for business purposes by a person, including a partnership, limited liability company, corporation, association, or any other legal entity, to which not more than five motor vehicles are registered in this state. "New motor vehicle" includes the chassis, chassis cab, and that portion of a motor home devoted to its propulsion, but does not include any portion designed, used, or maintained primarily for human habitation, a dealer-owned vehicle and a "demonstrator" or other motor vehicle sold with a manufacturer's new car warranty but does not include a motorcycle or a motor vehicle which is not registered under the Vehicle Code because it is to be operated or used exclusively off the highways. A demonstrator is a vehicle assigned by a dealer for the purpose of demonstrating qualities and characteristics common to vehicles of the same or similar model and type.

(3)"Motor home" means a vehicular unit built on, or permanently attached to, a self-propelled motor vehicle chassis, chassis cab, or van, which becomes an integral part of the completed vehicle, designed for human habitation for recreational or emergency occupancy.

(f)

(1) Except as provided in paragraph (2), no person shall sell, either at wholesale or retail, lease, or transfer a motor vehicle transferred by a buyer or lessee to a manufacturer pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (d) of Section 1793.2 or a similar statute of any other state, unless thenature of the nonconformity experienced by the original buyer or lessee is clearly and conspicuously disclosed to the prospective buyer, lessee, or transferee, the nonconformity is corrected, and the manufacturer warrants to the new buyer, lessee, or transferee in writing for a period of one year that the motor vehicle is free of that nonconformity.

(2) Except for the requirement that the nature of the nonconformity be disclosed to the transferee, paragraph (1) does not apply to the transfer of a motor vehicle to an educational institution if the purpose of the transfer is to make the motor vehicle available for use in automotive repair courses.

[EFFECTIVE 1/1/2001. Amended September 26, 2000 (Bill Number: SB 1718) (Chapter 679).] [Previously Amended September 21, 1999 (Bill Number: AB 1290) (Chapter 448).] [Previously Amended July 12, 1999 (Bill Number: SB 966) (Chapter 83).]

Find other Lemon Laws in these states:

Lemon Law - Alaska Lemon Law - Montana
Lemon Law - Alabama Lemon Law - North Carolina
Lemon Law - Arkansas Lemon Law - North Dakota
Lemon Law - Arizona Lemon Law - Nebraska
Lemon Law - California Lemon Law - New Hampshire
Lemon Law - Colorado Lemon Law - New Jersey
Lemon Law - Connecticut Lemon Law - New Mexico
Lemon Law - Delaware Lemon Law - Nevada
Lemon Law - Florida Lemon Law - New York
Lemon Law - Georgia Lemon Law - Ohio
Lemon Law - Hawaii Lemon Law - Oklahoma
Lemon Law - Iowa Lemon Law - Oregon
Lemon Law - Idaho Lemon Law - Pennsylvania
Lemon Law - Illinois Lemon Law - Rhode Island
Lemon Law - Indiana Lemon Law - South Carolina
Lemon Law - Kansas Lemon Law - South Dakota
Lemon Law - Kentucky Lemon Law - Tennessee
Lemon Law - Louisiana Lemon Law - Texas
Lemon Law - Massachusetts Lemon Law - Utah
Lemon Law - Maryland Lemon Law - Virginia
Lemon Law - Maine Lemon Law - Vermont
Lemon Law - Michigan Lemon Law - Washington
Lemon Law - Minnesota Lemon Law - Wisconsin
Lemon Law - Missouri Lemon Law - West Virginia
Lemon Law - Mississippi

Lemon Law - Wyoming

Lemon Law

Lemon Law - "Lemon law" is that body of state law which defines an automobile owners rights when the manufacturer is not able to repair the automobile within the limits specified by state lemon law.  In such cases, the automobile is referred to as a "lemon", and is subject to the conditions of the state lemon law.  

Your Lemon Law

Disclaimer:  These pages are created to inform and educate the public about lemon law and under the lemon law in your state. They are not and should not be considered legal opinions or advice as to whether you have rights under lemon law or whether you should pursue "a lemon law case".  If after reading this information, you believe you qualify, you should seek the advice and counsel of an attorney specializing in lemon law in your state.  Remember that each state's lemon laws vary.

Lemon Law - Lemon Law - Lemon Law- Lemon Law 

Assisted Living  | Home Care/Homecare  | Elder Law  | Canadian Pharmacies
  Advertising
Terms/Disclaimer

Our Sponsors

Find an attorney that is right for you

List your firm

Visit MealCall.org to find Meals on Wheels & Congregate Meal 
sites for seniors

advertising

 Structured Settlements