Senior Mag Home

Search

Elder Law

Assisted Living Senior Residence & Care

Senior Home Care & Healthcare Agencies

Canadian Pharmacies

Senior Health

Medical Glossaries

Personal Growth

Senior Money

State/Local Svcs

Wisdom 'n Humor

Computer Corner

Senior Travel

Senior Resources 
More Resources

About Senior Mag
 

 

 

Multi-Infarct Dementia

 

Definition
Multi-infarct dementia (M I D), a common cause of dementia in the elderly, occurs when blood clots block small blood vessels in the brain and destroy brain tissue. Probable risk factors are high blood pressure and advanced age. CADASIL (cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy) is an inherited form of MID.  

This disease can cause stroke, dementia, migraine-like headaches, and psychiatric disturbances. Symptoms of M I D, which often develop in a stepwise manner, include confusion, problems with recent memory, wandering or getting lost in familiar places, loss of bladder or bowel control (incontinence), emotional problems such as laughing or crying inappropriately, difficulty following instructions, and problems handling money. 

Usually the damage is so slight that the change is noticeable only as a series of small steps. However over time, as more small vessels are blocked, there is a gradual mental decline. M I D, which typically begins between the ages of 60 and 75, affects men more often than women.

Treatments
Currently there is no treatment for M I D that can reverse the damage that has already occurred. Treatment focuses on prevention of additional brain damage by controlling high blood pressure.

Prognosis
Prognosis for patients with M I D is generally poor. Individuals with the disease may improve for short periods of time, then decline again. Early treatment and management of blood pressure may prevent further progression of the disorder.

This disease can cause stroke, dementia, migraine-like headaches, and psychiatric disturbances. Symptoms of M I D, which often develop in a stepwise manner, include confusion, problems with recent memory, wandering or getting lost in familiar places, loss of bladder or bowel control (incontinence), emotional problems such as laughing or crying inappropriately, difficulty following instructions, and problems handling money. 

Usually the damage is so slight that the change is noticeable only as a series of small steps. However over time, as more small vessels are blocked, there is a gradual mental decline. M I D, which typically begins between the ages of 60 and 75, affects men more often than women.

Treatments
Currently there is no treatment for M I D that can reverse the damage that has already occurred. Treatment focuses on prevention of additional brain damage by controlling high blood pressure.

Prognosis
Prognosis for patients with M I D is generally poor. Individuals with the disease may improve for short periods of time, then decline again. Early treatment and management of blood pressure may prevent further progression of the disorder.

 

 

 

 

Assisted Living  | Home Care/Homecare  | Elder Law  | Canadian Pharmacies
  Advertising
Terms/Disclaimer

Sponsored Links

Hot Links
Tax Help
Wheelchairs
Long Term Care Insurance
Glucose monitors 
Electric Scooters
Diabetic Supplies
Hearing Aids
Senior Travel
Walking canes
Structured Settlements

Visit MealCall.org to find Meals on Wheels & Congregate Meal 
locations

advertising

  SeniorMag