Medication Fraud

by Samuel Witherspoon

Medications are very expensive for seniors and many simply cannot afford to buy the ones that they need on a fixed income.  Prices on US medications are often much higher than the exact same medications that can be bought in places like Canada, Israel, or Mexico.  However, as with anytime that someone is desperate, there are those who will take advantage of that need and make things even worse.

So it is with scum/spam merchants who send millions of spam emails that advertise medications at low prices.  They often even advertise that they will sell your medication to you without a prescription or will get their doctor to make a prescription for you.  You might ask yourself however, if you want any doctor diagnosing you via a form over the Internet.  

To someone who has been using a medication but needs to see their doctor again before they can get a refill, this sounds like it might be very tempting.  "After all", you reason, "nothing has changed, the doctor will refill the prescription when he gets his $75 fee.  Why not just eliminate the doctor from the equation and save the $75 doctor fee?"  

Okay, the logic sounds familiar and even understandable to those who cannot afford medications that they desperately need.  There are only two problems with this logic however, and there is an alternative that is safe and reasonable (see below).

Number one problem:
Things may indeed have changed for you and your medications might need to be adjusted or changed.  Your body changes and though you might not notice any difference, it could have changed enough that your medications also need to be changed.  

Your doctor might also have found a medication that will work even better for you, a new generic medication might be out that is cheaper, or your medications might be causing a problem that only some blood tests could determine.  You just don't know for sure, neither does your doctor until they examine you and possibly run tests, and that Internet doctor (if there really is one) most certainly doesn't know.

Use of some drugs require periodic tests of your organs like your kidneys, heart, or liver before you can continue.  Go without these tests, and the drug you are getting could be damaging one of your organs without your knowledge. 

Number two problem: 
Anyone who sends you spam that advertises medication IS a scoundrel and for many reasons:

First, it is illegal for them to send you prescription medications without a prescription from YOUR doctor.  Ask yourself, if they would violate this law, is there any reason that they would not break other laws too?  Of course not.

Second, it is illegal to send many drugs through the mail, even if you have a valid prescription.  Not even your local pharmacy can send you a bottle of narcotics such as Xanax or Valium and these spammers probably cannot even get the real thing.  

So if they cannot get you the real thing, what are they sending you?  If you are lucky, only sugar pills.  If you aren't so lucky, it could be something toxic, you could be depending upon this "medication" for your life, or you could have a reaction to something that you shouldn't have.

Third, legitimate companies do not have to send spam.  Illegitimate and illegal pharmacies have to switch domains and web servers all the time to stay ahead of the DEA, the FDA, and the FBI.  The only way they can get business is to send you an email.  Legitimate pharmacies advertise.  Illegal pharmacies send you spam.  Oh, and if you do have a reaction or a problem, you will never find the company that you bought the product from.

Legalities

Evidently, there are a few of these fraud "medication" merchants who do not require you to pay up front.  It probably has something to do with the fact that being set up to pay online could expose them to the law or it's just too costly to move it around from site to site.  

In such cases, this criminal will likely send you the medications along with a bill that he hopes you will pay by check, but knowing full well that many won't because his medications are junk.  

When they don't get paid they usually cause quite a fuss and threaten to send people to jail.  If you have ordered and are now getting these threats, don't worry about it.  Count yourself lucky that you are alive and healthy.  When they threaten to take you to court or call the police and charge you with a crime, tell them to go ahead and then they can explain their illegal drug operation to the court.  One of our readers agreed to help by offering to take the guy's name, address, and telephone number, and report the situation herself.  

Eliminate the spam

If you are like me, you get dozens of spam per day advertising things like mortgages, prescription medication, watches, porn, bootleg software, and a whole host of other useless or dangerous things.

Why do they send the spam?  Well actually, very few people do respond to spam email, but obviously there are some or they wouldn't do it.  If only 1 in 10,000 respond, the doesn't sound very profitable.  But if you send out 10 million every day, that's still 1000 clients, each day. 

What we have to do to stop this is to take away the profit.  Don't buy no matter how tempting it is.  When they've spammed you, it is a hoax or it is illegal.  If everyone quit buying from spam today, it would disappear in a month.  

The alternative to medication hoaxes

As promised, there is a great alternative to buying your medications from these criminals, and that is to work with legitimate Canadian Pharmacies that work within the law and submit themselves to Canadian regulations.  These regulations are basically the same as American regulations, but the drugs are still cheaper.  


 

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